Guide to Records of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange, 1894-1972

Digital Research Library, University Library System

Summary Information

Title
Records of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange
Creator
Pittsburgh Stock Exchange
Collection Number
MSS#150
Date [inclusive]
1894-1972
Extent
40
Language of Materials
The material in this collection is in English.
Abstract
The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange was a regional securities exchange that operated from 1894 until 1974. These records include minutes, transaction reports, charters, by-laws, committee records, and materials generated by other stock exchanges, as well as materials providing comprehensive documentation of the operation and management of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange from its founding in 1894 through the 1960s. Records also provide financial documentation for most large Pittsburgh banks throughout the twentieth century.

Preferred Citation

Records of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange, 1894-1972, MSS# 150, Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center.

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Historical Sketch

The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange was a regional securities exchange that operated from 1894 until 1974. The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange provided facilities for its members to execute transactions in securities (stocks and bonds) traded for either the members of the Exchange or their clients. At the Exchange, stocks and bonds, primarily from local banks, industrial corporations and businesses, were traded. Cities across the country had similar exchanges to facilitate the raising of capital needed for businesses in their region and to overcome the problems of communications that would limit a person's ability to trade on the New York exchanges. Regional stock markets were opened throughout the country and were located in larger cities such as Boston, Cincinnati, Detroit, and Philadelphia. These regional exchanges reached a peak in activity around the time of the Stock Market Crash of 1929 and never rebounded to pre-crash levels of activity. Even the practice of listing a stock initially on a regional exchange before moving to the New York Stock Exchange fell out of favor after the 1920s. As more of the country's financial business was centered in New York City in the 1930s and beyond, the need for regional stock exchanges waned.

The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange traced its origins to the booming oil trade in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. After Colonel Drake successfully drilled for oil in Titusville (Venango County), Pennsylvania in 1859, Pittsburgh became the center for the trade of oil between those who transported the oil down the Allegheny River and those who purchased the oil for shipment elsewhere in the country. In the summer of 1867, the oil traders organized as the Pittsburgh Brokers Association and operated in downtown Pittsburgh on the Allegheny River at Duquesne Way. Eleven years later, the first organized market was established in Pittsburgh. On July 25, 1878, the Pittsburgh Oil Exchange was founded with 180 members. The Exchange's initial officers were President George W. Cochran, Vice-President Jonathan Gallager, Treasurer W. N. Riddle and Secretary S. M. Willcock.

The Pittsburgh Oil Exchange was succeeded by the Pittsburgh Petroleum Exchange, incorporated on January 23, 1882. Like its predecessor, the Petroleum Exchange was established to protect and encourage the petroleum business in Pittsburgh. The Petroleum Exchange did not formally open for business until April 22, 1884 when they moved into a new building. Their officers were President C. W. Batchelor, Treasurer B. W. Vandergrift, and Secretary J. I. Buchanan. During the first eight months of operation, the Petroleum Exchange cleared 843,416,000 barrels of petroleum, averaging almost four million barrels daily.

While the Pittsburgh Petroleum Exchange thrived during the Western Pennsylvania oil boom, the diversified and growing economy of Pittsburgh and the region caused the leaders of the Exchange to expand their scope of operations. The charter was amended on January 11, 1886 when the name was changed to the Pittsburgh Petroleum, Stock and Metal Exchange. This new market was established to protect and encourage trade and commerce in Pittsburgh for more than just the petroleum industry. Factors involved in this decision include the establishment of gas stocks in 1886 and 1887, the establishment of rapid transit facilities in Pittsburgh (which necessitated the issuance of securities and a market for them), and the growth of the Standard Oil Company. This last factor might be considered the most significant reason for the change of this organization from petroleum to stocks. With the passing of control of the oil markets to Standard Oil, trading in oil was limited to the decreasing number of independent dealers and gradually diminished. In the late 1880s, brokers focused more on stocks as the trading of oil certificates was gradually eliminated. The Exchange did not successfully make this transition to a stock market and the value of the stock for the Exchange, that members owned and traded at market prices, dropped sharply. This drop in both the monetary value and commercial interest in the Exchange was heightened by the national depression of 1893. The Exchange folded and its property was sold at auction on August 17, 1893. A meeting of former active members of the Exchange was held on March 26, 1894 and began discussions that led to the establishment of the Pittsburgh Stock and Oil Exchange, the organization known after 1896 as the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. The Stock Exchange's original officers were President Henry M. Long, Vice President S. S. Pinkerton, and Secretary-Treasurer John B. Barbour.

The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange was originally located in the Union Trust Building (335 Fourth Avenue) and the Citizens Insurance Building until fire forced them to relocate in 1897. The Exchange moved to the banking rooms of the Commercial National Bank (315 Fourth Avenue) and in April 1901, moved to the Pittsburgh Bank for Savings Building. The Exchange found permanent quarters in the old Mechanics National Bank building (333 Fourth Avenue) in the fall of 1902 after additional memberships were sold to help finance the purchase of the building. These additional memberships brought the total number of members to 130, up from fifty at the founding of the Exchange.

In the early years of the Exchange, the trading of stocks was restricted to brief periods of the day when a certain stock would be given a quotation. These events were known as daily "calls," and provided members with the purchase and sales price of stocks. These quotations were accepted by banks as valid numbers that would be used for negotiating collateral for loans. In the first few years, calls were limited to fifteen minutes per stock. With the increased popularity of the Exchange, the daily call was extended to thirty minutes and increased in frequency to three times a day. On February 10, 1902, the Exchange instituted daily continuous sessions, that were observed for the remainder of the Exchange's history. With this increased opportunity to buy and sell stocks, the volume of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange increased greatly between the early years and the peak years of the Exchange in the 1920s.

Led by the great industrial and commercial growth of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange became a clearing house for stocks of most of the great Pittsburgh companies including Allegheny-Ludlum Steel, Bank of Pittsburgh, Consolidated Ice Company, Harbison-Walker Refractories, Joseph Horne and Company, Jones and Laughlin Steel Company, Pittsburgh Plate Glass, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing, and others. By 1929, a total of 204 issues traded on the Exchange with 159 of that number being capital, common and preferred stocks and the remainder being bonds. Included in the 1929 figures are 34 regional banks and companies from other parts of the country. The number of stocks listed on the Exchange grew rapidly in the late 1920s, in part because of heightened interest in the stock market before the great crash of October 29, 1929. Despite the Great Depression, there were many periods of active trading in the 1930s on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange led by the presence of numerous Fortune 500 companies in Pittsburgh and the high concentration of stock owners in the Pittsburgh area.

The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange suffered two lengthy suspensions of activity in its early history. The first major disturbance was the closing of the Exchange from October 23, 1907 until January 26, 1908. This closing was necessitated by the general depression in the country and its particularly damaging effects in Pittsburgh. During this depression, George Westinghouse declared bankruptcy and his company nearly folded. Complicating commercial matters in Pittsburgh that year was the flood of 1907. The other major closure by the Exchange occurred at the outbreak of World War I in Europe. Following the pattern of other exchanges in the United States and Europe, the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange suspended daily sessions on July 31, 1914 and remained closed until December 2 of the same year. In addition to these major closures, the Exchange was closed at numerous smaller intervals to observe the deaths of presidents, civic celebrations and other worthy events.

After the Stock Market Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, the volume and interest in the regional stock exchanges waned and activity never reached pre-crash numbers. The greater control of the securities trading industry that was established through the Securities and Exchange Commission eliminated the regional exchanges blanket exemption from blue-sky laws. These laws were designed to protect the public from fraudulent purchases of securities. On the positive side, the regional exchanges were encouraged to remain a viable entity by the Securities Exchange Act (SEA) of 1934. In that Act, the SEC provided three ways for the regional exchanges (and others) to conduct unlisted trading of national stocks at their local exchanges. Members of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange could purchase and sell stock that was not listed on the Exchange if that stock was listed on a national exchange (as most were). Furthermore, the commission price for stock transactions of New York Stock Exchange shares would cost less if purchased through the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. While this presumably assisted the regional exchanges, this provision in the SEA did not fully rejuvenate them.

By March, 1961, there were 14 securities exchanges in the United States that were registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission as national securities exchanges. Besides the two major New York stock exchanges and smaller exchanges that dealt primarily in mining shares, the remaining seven exchanges were the regional exchanges and included: Boston, Midwest, Philadelphia-Baltimore-Washington, Pacific Coast, Cincinnati, Detroit and Pittsburgh. The two dominant stock markets, the New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange handled the clear majority of volume in stocks traded and dollar worth. From 1935 until 1958, the New York Stock Exchange annually handled around 85% of the dollar volume and averaged over 70% of the volume of stocks. Over the same time period, the American Stock Exchange averaged around 10% of the dollar value and nearly 15% of the volume of stocks. These two exchanges handled all but 7% of the dollar volume and all but 10% of the total share volume over that 24 year span. In 1959, the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange handled only .08% of the total dollar volume and .11% of the total share volume and ranked below regional exchanges in Philadelphia-Baltimore, Boston and Detroit. By 1964, the dollar value of the stocks traded at the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange dropped to .06% of the New York Stock Exchange and only .05% of its volume. This low volume placed the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange along with the Cincinnati Stock Exchange at the bottom of the seven regional exchanges in stocks traded. By this time, most of the stocks listed on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange were also listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the values of those stocks were taken from the New York prices.

In 1969, the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange announced their merger with the Philadelphia-Baltimore-Washington Stock Exchange (PBW), a regional exchange that had a working agreement with the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange since 1956. As per the merger agreement, the PSE operated in Pittsburgh for five years and then moved all operations to the PBW in 1974. PSE President K. B. Cunningham oversaw the last day of trading on August 23, 1974. By that time, there were only three employees of the Exchange and only two exclusively listed stocks: Pittsburgh Brewing Company and Williams and Co. On the last day of trading, 3,100 shares of 11 different companies were traded including Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Corporation as well as Chrysler Corporation and Ramada Inns. With the closing of the Exchange in 1974, all stock trading done by the PBW was done in Philadelphia.

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Scope and Content Notes

These records include minutes, transaction reports, charters, by-laws, committee records, materials generated by other stock exchanges, as well as materials providing comprehensive documentation of the operation and management of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange from its founding in 1894 through the 1960s. Of note are daily transaction records from the founding of the Exchange in 1894 through 1970, yearly summaries of transactions by company name, extensive bulletins relating to new equity issues by local and national companies, and minutes providing information on the operation of the Exchange. Additionally, the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange Records provide strong financial documentation for most large Pittsburgh companies and banks throughout the twentieth century.

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Arrangement

The Pittsburgh Stock Exchange Records are housed in 12 archival boxes and are arranged in three series. Series have been designated for Administrative Records, Transactions, and Material Generated by Other Stock Exchanges.

These materials were rearranged on June 19, 1995.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

Digital Research Library, University Library System Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, Spring, 1999

Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center
1212 Smallman Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
library@hswp.org

Revision Description

 Converted from EAD Version 1.0 to EAD Version 2002 July 1, 2006

Restrictions on Access

This collection is open for research.

Restrictions on Use

Property rights reside with the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. Literary rights are retained by the creators of the records and their heirs. For permissions to reproduce or publish, please contact the curator of the Archives.

Acquisition Information

These materials were received in two accessions.

Acc# 1975.192, Gift of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange (Records). 1975

Acc# 1996.0264, Gift of the McCullum, Gable, and McDonald families (Sales and Closings Quotation book, 1929). 1996

Processing Information

This collection was processed by the Historical Society Staff c. 1975

These records were rearranged and the finding aid was rewritten by Corey Seeman on June 16, 1995.

Revision and rearrangement for the encoded version of the finding aid provided by Jennifer Marshall in February, 1999.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Associated Stock Exchanges
  • Boston Stock Exchange
  • Cincinnati Stock Exchange
  • Detroit Stock Exchange
  • New Orleans Stock Exchange
  • New York Stock Exchange
  • New York Curb Exchange
  • Philadelphia-Balitmore Stock Exchange
  • Pittsburgh Clearing House

Geographic Name(s)

  • Pittsburgh (Pa.) -- Business
  • Pittsburgh (Pa.) -- Commerce
  • Pittsburgh (Pa.) -- Industry

Subject(s)

  • Banks and banking -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Bonds -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Finance -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Investments -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Petroleum industry and trade -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Securities -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Stock-exchange -- Law and legislation -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Stock-exchange -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Stockbrokers -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Stocks -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh

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Collection Inventory

Series I Administrative Records   

Scope and Content Notes

The Administrative Records are arranged alphabetically by folder title with the minutes arranged to the front. Administrative Records include minutes, by-laws, committee materials, historical materials, membership lists and a visitors' register. These records document the management and day-to-day operation ofthe Pittsburgh Stock Exchange, primarily from its founding through the 1950s. While the administrative records document the activities of the Exchange, there is extensive information on various Pittsburgh and national companies in material found in this series. Of note are Securities Committee bulletins and rulings that include detailed information on the state of a company at the time of a public stock or bond offering and information on the stocks themselves.

The minutes are for both the Board of Directors and full member meetings and primarily document the first thirty years of the Exchange through 1925. The Board of Directors minutes include accounts of the directors meeting, incoming correspondence to the board, and information on the finances of the PSE. Meetings were generally held twice a month and issues for discussion included the purchase or exchange of seats on the Exchange, change of rules, rates of commissions, elections of officers, new listings, committee reports and other issues relating to the operation of the Exchange. Also included in the minutes are numerous discussions related to particular issues such as the May 1922 petition concerning the replacement of the free telephone with a pay phone and problems concerning transactions of Liberty Loan bonds during World War I. The board discussed all closings of the Exchange such as after the September 1901 assassination of President McKinley and during regional financial instability. During the 1907 financial crisis in Pittsburgh, the board met nearly every business day from October 23, 1907 to January 27, 1908 to discuss the closed Exchange and plans for reopening. inutes during the prolonged closing are brief and provide information on those in attendance and their decision to keep the Exchange closed. Of note is the repeated mention and importance of the Pittsburgh Clearing House in the decision making process of reopening the Exchange. The board minutes for this period are indexed and list events and names including: stocks, listings, members, officers, elections, committees and the dates the Exchange closed. However, the index does not include the period from July 16, 1907 to the end of 1909. The Members Minutes document the full members meetings and include information on the changes in the by-laws and constitution of the Exchange and general concerns of the membership primarily between 1909 and 1923. These minutes generally provide less documentation about the operation of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange than the board minutes but do provide information on the concerns of the members.

Committee Materials document the work of the Arbitration Committee and the Securities Committee of the Exchange and primarily include printed documents produced for the regulation of securities and their transactions. Arbitration Committee materials are not comprehensive, but do provide information on the resolution of disputes, mostly relating to the sales of stocks from one party to another. Included with this material is correspondence, reports, minutes, and financial materials, primarily from 1902 to 1910. There is no Arbitration Committee material relating to the financial crisis and Exchange closing in 1907.

Securities Committee Bulletins are published documents that provide financial statements of companies that offered additional common or preferred stock through the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. The bulletins provide general information about the company and include: the transfer agent of the particular offering, date and place of incorporation, main office, Pittsburgh office, total capitalization, bonds, dividends, capital stock changes, plants and facilities, balance sheet, earnings, officers, directors and other pertinent information. Also included is a prose description of the company's operations or product including information on subsidiaries, manufacturing plants, mines, etc. This information provides a snapshot of the company at the time of the public offering. Securities Committee Rulings document the stock stricken or added to the list of securities traded by the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. Also included is the issuing of additional stocks by companies that already list their securities on the Exchange, the change in par value for individual securities, and the planning of the purchase of a company's outstanding stock by the same company. The rulings are bound in volumes and, with the exception of the volume from 1903 until 1923, include an index in the front of every volume with all securities listed by company name and the specific identification of the security (common stock, preferred stock, bond, etc.). Included with these materials is correspondence from companies and transfer agents concerning the status of stocks being offered or withdrawn from the Exchange. Of note is information on odd-lot sales transactions found with the rulings from 1939 to 1940 and the volume from 1932 to 1940 that primarily lists the activity of stocks of companies outside of Pittsburgh.

Other Administrative Materials include by-laws and charters, membership records, historical materials and a visitors' ledger. The by-laws and charters are printed and manuscript copies of the by-laws reflecting the changes in the operation of the Exchange from 1896 through 1921. Additional changes made after 1921 are handwritten or pasted into the 1921 printed by-laws. The membership records include two ledgers, listing members during the first thirty years of the Exchange's history in alphabetical order with information on when they joined the Exchange or were removed. The two ledgers overlap for the year 1911, meaning members of the Exchange before and after that date will generally appear in both volumes. The 1929 printed history of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange is arranged as historical material and tells the history of the Exchange prior to the stock market crash of 1929. The visitors register covers the years 1926 through 1959 and is only 20% filled, possibly showing low attendance by visitors.

Minutes -- Board of Directors  1894-1925 
 1894-July 3, 1907 
 July 17, 1907-1909 
 1910-1918 
 1919-Dec. 18, 1925 
  boxfolder
Index 1894-1925 11
Charters and By-laws 
  folder
 1896 2
  boxfolder
 1911-1921 21
Committees -- Arbitration 
Securities Bulletins 
 1918-1922 
  folder
 1923-1925 2
  boxfolder
 1931-1934 31
  folder
Rules of Operation 1930-1968 2
Rulings 
 1903-Jan. 1923 
  folder
 Feb. 1923-1925 3
  folder
 1926-1931 4
  folder
 1932-1934 5
  box
 1937-1938 4
  folder
 1941-1942 1
  folder
 1943-1944 2
  boxfolder
 1945-1946 51
  folder
 1947-1948 2
  folder
 1949-1950 3
  folder
 1951-1952 4
  folder
 1953-1954 5
  boxfolder
 1955-1956 61
  folder
 1957-1958 2
  folder
Historical Material 1929 3
Membership Lists 
 c. 1894-1911 
 c. 1911-1925 
  folder
New Members 1911-1972 4
Visitors' Register 1926-1959 

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Series II Transactions   

Scope and Content Notes

The Transactions materials are arranged alphabetically by folder title and volume title and include comprehensive documentation of the daily transactions that took place at the Exchange. These materials includeDividend Payments, Quarterly Records, Quotations and Sales, and Sales and Closing Quotes. These records provide detailed accounts of the transactions of the Exchange and will provide researchers with valuable information on the growth and decline of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. Since much of the stock traded on the Exchange was also traded elsewhere, it is important to note that these transaction records provide information solely on the stock activity on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange and do not provide information on transactions that took place on other regional or national exchanges.

The Quotations and Sales records provide detailed accounts of daily transactions that took place at the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange founding in 1894 through 1970. A full entry for the Exchange is recorded each day with information on stock prices and stock trades for both stocks that are exclusively listed on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange and stocks from national exchanges that were traded at the Exchange. Information found in these books primarily includes the stock's closing quotation (or price) and a full list of stock sales, noting the number of shares traded, the share price, and initials for the buying and selling brokerage house. Consistently found throughout these Quotations and Sales records are summaries of transactions that were compiled at the end of every day, week, month and year. The Sales and Closing Quotes records provide accounts of daily activity for each stock traded on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange from 1924 until 1968. These records are arranged by company name and provide quick reference to the fluctuation and activity for a particular stock or other equity over the course of a year. Information for each daily entry for a stock includes the number of shares traded, the share price (high, low and closing (last) price), and the bid and ask price. Entries for individual stocks are generally recorded for any day that stocks were traded or were offered for sale. Of note are monthly summaries of activity for each stock traded on the Exchange.

Other materials arranged with this series include dividend records kept by the Exchange and the published Quarterly Record. Dividend Payment materials were recorded by the Exchange for all dividend-paying stocks listed strictly on the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. The dividend payment materials were kept two distinct ways and are sporadic for the history of the Exchange. The larger group of dividend records are arranged by company name and include all payments from c1918 through 1960. These payment records include common stock, preferred stock and other company equities. The other group of dividend payments is a chronological record that documents the period between 1923 and 1926. The Quarterly Record is the publication issued for the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange that serves as a quick reference for companies listed on the Exchange. Spanning nearly every quarter from 1915 until 1934, these volumes provide brief descriptions of company operations, general financial information, and other information for most of Pittsburgh's leading companies. The Quarterly Record also included a tip-in sheet known as the Banking Supplement. The Banking Supplement covers the years 1917 through 1934 and includes general financial information for all banks doing business in the Pittsburgh area.

Dividend Payments c. 1918-1960 (by Company Name) 
  folder
A-J 5
  folder
K-Z 6
 1923-1926 
Quarterly Record 
  folder
 1915-1920 7
  folder
 1921-1922 8
  boxfolder
 1923-1924 71
  folder
 1925-1926 2
  folder
 1927-1928 3
  folder
 1929-1930 4
  folder
 1931-1934 5
  folder
Banking Supplement 1917-1934 6
Quotations and Sales 
 1894 
 1895 
 1896 
 1897 
 1898 
 1899 
 1900 
 January-August 3, 1901 
 August 4-December, 1901 
 1902 
 1903 
 1904 
 1905 
 1906 
 1907 
 1908 
 1909 
 1910 
 1911 
 1912 
 1913 
 1914 
 1915 
 1916 
 1917 
 1918 
 1919 
 1920 
 1921 
 1922 
 1923 
 1924 
 1925 
 1926 
 1927 
 1928 
 1929 
 1930 
 1931 
 1932 
 1933 
 1934 
 1935 
 1936 
 1937 
 1938 
 1939 
 1940 
 1941 
 1942 
 1943 
 1944 
 1945 
 1946 
 1947 
 1948 
 1949 
 1950 
 1951 
 1952 
 1953 
 1954 
 1955 
 1956 
 1957 
 1958 
 1959 
 1960 
 1961 
 1962 
 1963 
 1964 
  boxfolder
 January-February, 1965 81
  folder
 March-May 14, 1965 2
  folder
 May 17-July 16, 1965 3
  folder
 July 19-September 24, 1965 4
  folder
 September 27-December 1965 5
  folder
 January-February, 1966 6
  folder
March-April, 1965  7
  folder
 May-July, 1966 8
  boxfolder
 August-October 10, 1966 91
  folder
 October 11-December, 1966 2
  folder
 January-February, 1967 3
  folder
 March-April, 1967 4
  folder
 May-June, 1967 5
  folder
 July-August, 1967 6
  folder
 September-October, 1967 7
  folder
 November-December, 1967 8
  boxfolder
 January-February, 1968 101
  folder
 March-April, 1968 2
  folder
 May-July, 1968 3
  folder
 August-October, 1968 4
  folder
 November-December, 1968 5
  folder
 January-February, 1969 6
  folder
 March-April, 1969 7
  folder
 May-June, 1969 8
  folder
 July-August, 1969 9
  boxfolder
 September-October, 1969 111
  folder
 November-December, 1969 2
  folder
 January-February, 1970 3
  folder
 March-June, 1970 4
Sales and Closing Quotes 
 1924 
 1925 
 1926 
 1927 
 1928 
 1929 
 1930 
 1931 
 1932 
 1933 
 1934 
 1935 
 1936 
 1937 
 1938 
 1939 
 1940 
 1941 
 1942 
 1943 
 1944 
 1945 
 1946 
 1947 
 1948 
 1949 
 1950 
 1951 
 1952 
 1953 
 1954 
 1955 
 1956 
 1957 
 1958 
 1959 
 1960 
 1961 
 1962 
 1963 
 1964 
 1965 
 1966 
 1967 
 1968 

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Series III Materials from Other Exchanges   

Scope and Content Notes

The Materials from Other Exchanges are arranged alphabetically by folder title and primarily include publications produced by national and regional stock exchanges. These publications include directories of members and member firms, constitutions and bylaws of the particular exchanges, guide to exchange operations and other general information. Generally, these publications have not been annotated and only provide information on these regional and national exchanges including: Boston, Cincinnati, Detroit, New Orleans, New York, and Philadelphia -Baltimore. Of note is the 1929 directory for the Associated Stock Exchanges organization that includes extensive information on member exchanges including: Baltimore, Cincinnati, Columbus, Detroit, Hartford, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis and Washington. Also included are government publications concerning the Securities Act of 1934.

  folder
Associated Stock Exchanges 1929-1933 5
  folder
Boston Stock Exchange 1967-1968 6
  folder
Cincinnati Stock Exchange c. 1930 7
  folder
Detroit Stock Exchange 1945-1953 8
  folder
New Orleans Stock Exchange 1926 9
  folder
New York Curb Exchange and New York Stock Exchange 1926 10
  folder
Constitution 1931 11
  boxvolume
Directory and Guide 1932 12[1]
  folder
Philadelphia-Baltimore Stock Exchange 1943-1963 1
  folder
Securities Act of 1934 1934-1936 2

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